Researchers come to the Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship from a spectrum of backgrounds. Some may have little or no formal training in computation, but are eager to apply high-performance computing to their area of expertise, be it astrophysics, engineering or energy production. Others are steeped in computer science and mathematics and are seeking new ways to apply their skills. In these short profiles, fourth-year fellows discuss the fellowship, their research and their career goals.


  • Casey
    Berger
    Casey left a Hollywood career to pursue quantum physics research...
  • Riley
    Brady
    The physics of ocean currents and climate fascinate Riley...
  • Maximilian
    Bremer
    Max blew away limits on a hurricane simulation’s performance...
  • Brian
    Cornille
    Brian’s mathematical methods could help advance fusion energy...
  • Julia
    Ebert
    Julia weaves biology, technology and more to explore behavior, swarms and space...
  • Sarah
    Elliott
    Sarah’s practicum led her to model combustion reactions...
  • Harshil
    Kamdar
    His models follow star formation and movement through the galaxy...
  • Carson
    Kent
    Carson began working on DOE supercomputers in high school...
  • Brett
    Larsen
    He combines math with biophysics and neuroscience...
  • Yuexia
    Lin
    She seeks new ways to track the interactions of fluids and solids...
  • Noah
    Mandell
    Noah’s domain is the turbulent world of fusion plasmas...
  • Kelly
    Moran
    A DOE lab job led Kelly to use statistics to study disease...
  • Mario
    Ortega
    High-performance computing helps Mario predict neutron activity...
  • Clay
    Sanders
    To demonstrate his methods, Clay calculates properties for acoustic cloaking...
  • Sukin
    Sim
    Her work helps unlock quantum computing’s potential...
  • Laura
    Watkins
    Her research has taken her from dirt to fundamental drug mechanisms...