Los Alamos National Laboratory


Uncertainty Quantification in Fracture Networks
Amy Lovell, Michigan State University
Practicum Year: 2017
Practicum Supervisor: Gowri Srinivasan, Scientist-3, T-5, Los Alamos National Laboratory
This project was an introduction to looking at the uncertainties within the models for fracture networks (in terms of hydrocarbon production, i.e. fracking). The goal was to understand the physical processes that contribute to the long-term tail of the production curve, since this region is generally under-estimated by the discrete fracture networks that the group typically uses. We explored diffusion, the height of the damage zone, and the percentage of free gas in the fracture network. At the same time (but along a separate line of reasoning), we explored using a simple diffusion model to describe this tailing behavior, to look at folding in uncertainties in the fracture length distributions.
6Li(n,t) Cross Section Up to 10 MeV
Leo Kirsch, University of California, Berkeley
Practicum Year: 2016
Practicum Supervisor: Dr. Matt Devlin, Team Leader, P-27, Los Alamos National Laboratory
The 6Li(n,t) cross section is important for weapons physics, nuclear reactors, neutron detection, and astrophysics. The uncertainties in the current ENDF evaluation are as high as 15% above a few MeV due to conflicting results from various experiments. The goal of this project was to provide additional information for the evaluators and minimize the systematic errors in the R-Matrix fit. The experiment had three 6Li detectors one meter away from a 252Cf fission chamber to use the time of flight method to determine the neutron energy. The 6Li in the detectors acted as the target material.
Accretion Disks from Neutron Star Mergers
Cole Holcomb, Princeton University
Practicum Year: 2015
Practicum Supervisor: Christopher L. Fryer, , Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences , Los Alamos National Laboratory
We performed global multidimensional simulations of the nascent disks surrounding remnants of neutron star mergers by utilizing the general relativistic radiation magnetohydrodynamics (GRRMHD) code HARM. Particular interest was given to the morphological and nucleosynthetic evolution of these systems.
Cu Corrosion Measurements in and Engineered Barrier System
Sarah Palaich Heffern, University of California, Los Angeles
Practicum Year: 2015
Practicum Supervisor: Florie Caporuscio, Dr., Radiogeochemistry Team, Los Alamos National Laboratory
I quantified the amount of Cu corrosion that occurred during various high pressure, high temperature runs in hydrous media with clays used in engineered barrier systems that are part of nuclear repositories. I took reflected light images and and used the SEM to image the corrosion and then quantified the amount of corrosion by taking over 800 measurements of corrosion pitting. These measurements help us understand the extent of corrosion in Cu materials that may be used in nuclear repositories.
Monte Carlo Modeling of the National Ignition Facility's Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic
Adam Cahill, Cornell University
Practicum Year: 2012
Practicum Supervisor: Hans W. Herrmann, , P-24 Plasma Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory
Data collected from NIF diagnostics contains inherent uncertainties due to random noise introduced by the diagnostic and data acquisition equipment. A monte carlo model of the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic was built to evaluate the extent to which instrument noise affects inferred nuclear reaction conditions. A gamma burst from a DT fusion reaction was taken as the model's starting point and used to generate noisy oscilloscope traces. Reaction parameters were then inferred from these scope traces and compared to the true values from the starting point. This provided an estimate of the errors associated with GRH data.
Neutron Activation of Cd, Zn, and Nb
Nicole Fields, University of Chicago
Practicum Year: 2011
Practicum Supervisor: Steve Elliott, Technical Staff Member, P-23, Los Alamos National Laboratory
For this project we used the LANSCE facility to irradiate Cd, Zn, and Nb foils with neutrons. We then counted these irradiated foils on a low background Ge detector at WIPP near Carlsbad, NM. From these data we will be able to determine the production cross sections for various radioactive isotopes from neutron activation of Cd, Zn, and Nb.
Proto-Neutron Star Evolution
Luke Roberts, University of California, Santa Cruz
Practicum Year: 2009
Practicum Supervisor: Sanjay Reddy, Staff Member, Theoretical Division T-16, Los Alamos National Laboratory
During the first few minutes of a neutron stars life, it cools from its initial extremely high temperature state by emitting a prodigious number of neutrinos. To study in detail how this cooling occurs, we developed a general relativistic neutrino transport /stellar structure code. To accurately track the evolution of the young neutron star, we employed state of the art microphysics for both the nuclear equation of state and the neutrino opacities. The effect of hydrodynamic instabilities in the interior on the cooling timescale of the young neutron star were then investigated by implementing a one-dimensional prescription for energy transport by convective motions. These results will help us to understand how hydrodynamic instabilities and the nuclear equation of state affect the spectra of the emitted neutrinos. If neutrinos are observed from a nearby supernova, this will give us a direct window into the high density physics that governs the young neutron star, which is in a regime that cannot be accessed in the laboratory.
Data Analysis of Neutron Capture Measurements on arsenic-75 using DANCE
Paul Ellison, University of California, Berkeley
Practicum Year: 2008
Practicum Supervisor: David Vieira, Nuclear Chemistry Team Leader, Chemistry, Los Alamos National Laboratory
I performed my practicum under the supervision of Dr. David Vieira of the Nuclear and Radiochemistry Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. I worked on analyzing data taken on the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). The DANCE array is a highly segmented, high efficiency barium fluoride gamma ray detector array designed to measure the gamma cascade following neutron capture on small (mg quantity) isotope-enriched stable and radioactive (T1/2>100 d, <1 Ci) targets. The data I specifically analyzed was measured to obtain the neutron capture cross section of arsenic-75 as a function of neutron energy. The measurement of this quantity is important for the fields of nuclear astrophysics and stockpile stewardship science.