CSGF Announces Record Incoming Class for 2016-17

Location: 
Ames, Iowa
Date: 
Thursday, April 28, 2016

The Department of Energy Computational Science Graduate Fellowship (DOE CSGF) was established in 1991 to train and produce the country's next generation of leaders in computational science. More than 400 students have been named fellows in the time since, each a representative for computing's capacity to advance science across a variety of disciplines.

A record 27 new awardees — the fellowship's twenty-sixth incoming class — will begin their studies this fall:

Riley Brady
University of Colorado
Atmospheric and Oceanic Dynamics

Brian Cornille
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics

Emily Crabb
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Condensed Matter Theory

Julia Ebert
Harvard University
Bioengineering

Sarah Elliott
University of Georgia
Computational Chemistry

Jenelle Feather
University of California, Berkeley
Neuroscience

Sarah Gady
Princeton University
Computational Science and Engineering

Claire-Alice Hebert
Stanford University
Applied Physics

Daniel Jacobson
California Institute of Technology
Computational Chemistry

Harshil Kamdar
California Institute of Technology
Natural Sciences

Kelly Kochanski
University of Colorado
Earth Surface Processes

Brett Larsen
Stanford University
Physics

Yuexia Lin
Harvard University
Applied Mathematics

Thomas Ludwig
Stanford University
Chemical Engineering
Sean Marks
University of Pennsylvania
Chemical Engineering

Kayla McCue
Princeton University
Quantitative and Computational Biology

Kelly Moran
Duke University
Statistics

Ian Ochs
Princeton University
Plasma Physics

Mario Ortega
University of California, Berkeley
Nuclear Engineering

Nicholas Rivera
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Optical Physics

Amaresh Sahu
University of California, Berkeley
Biophysics

Andrés Salcedo
Ohio State University
Astronomy

Clay Sanders
Duke University
Civil Engineering/Computational Mechanics

Sukin Sim
Harvard University
Chemical Physics

Laura Watkins
University of Chicago
Theoretical Chemistry

Blake Wetherton
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Plasma Physics

Cristina White
Stanford University
Mechanical Engineering

 

As part of the program, these individuals receive exceptional benefits including a yearly stipend; full payment of university tuition and required fees (during the appointment period); and an annual academic allowance. Renewable for up to four years, the fellowship is guided by a comprehensive program of study that requires focused coursework in the areas of science/engineering, computer science and applied mathematics. It also includes a three-month practicum at one of 21 Department of Energy laboratories or sites across the country.

 

Additional details for each fellow will be available via the program's online fellow directory on or after September 1, 2016. Meanwhile, please contact us for further information.